Quilting Supplies at Craftsy.com

Sewing Machine Mat Tutorial

Sewing Machine Mat Tutorial

Today is my stop on Riley Blake Designs Quilted Cotton Blog Tour!

I have a quick and easy sewing project using their new

Double-Sided Quilted Cottons….which are just too fun!

Riley Blake Designs

Sewing Machine Mat Tutorial

I absolutely love my sewing machine mat and can’t imagine working without it! Mine was a handmade gift from my sister and really changed my sewing experience. Having all your tools right at your finger tips is great. No more knocking them off the table and trying to find where they landed:) I like my sewing table low and my knees just slide right under the pockets and I don’t even know they are there. Not to mention it adds some flare to your sewing studio!

Sewing Machine Mat Tutorial


22″ x 24″ piece of RBD Double Sided Quilted Cotton- Medium Chevron/Dot in Aqua.

1 Fat Quarter of a coordination print/solid for Binding- Honeycomb Dot, Tone on Tone in Red.



Cut your Fat Quarter lengthwise into six 2.5″ strips, then join on the diagonal to create one long strip of binding. HERE is a machine binding tutorial to help if you need it!

Using the binding you just made, bind the edges of your 22″ x 24″ piece of double-sided quilted cotton just like it was an entire quilt. HERE is a tutorial for binding a quilt.

Sewing Machine Mat Tutorial

Fold up the bottom edge of your mat approximately 5″(this doesn’t have to be really specific). Secure ends with pins to hold in place. Decide for yourself how you want your double sided prints to show. One side will be the top and the reverse will be the pockets.

Sewing Machine Mat Tutorial

Using a removable marking pen, mark lines where you want your pockets and how far apart you want them. You can adjust this to hold your special tools. I used a disappearing ink pen, but a water soluble or chalk marking tool are other good choices.

Sewing Machine Mat Tutorial

I like a few bigger pockets for my machine quilting gloves with three smaller slots for a pen, seam ripper or a specialty tool. You can’t go wrong here!

Sewing Machine Mat Tutorial

Using a matching thread, stitch along the outer edge just inside the binding. Start  just below the binding at the opening of the pocket and end at the fold where the bottom of the pocket will be. This will close the sides.

Sewing Machine Mat Tutorial

Now finish stitching all of the lines you marked to create your pockets.

Voila! That’s it…simple right?

For the more edgy quilter….I ventured out and made a sewing machine mat with skulls! Yes, I said skulls:) I know they don’t float everyone’s boat, but I thought it would be fun. I even added a little bow to give it some extra sassy-ness! The binding and bow are a Riley Blake Designs solid FQ in Hot Pink.


Don’t like skulls or chevrons>>>> click HERE to see all the fun prints they have to offer.

***I am going to giveaway both of these sewing machine mats!***

So if you are interested and want to enter, just leave a comment telling me which one you want…chevron or skulls.

Giveaway is open through the 18th. Open internationally.

In case you missed it, I also have a coupon code good for 20% off your purchase at Gotcha Covered Quilting!



Here is the schedule so you can follow along with all the quilty goodness:)

6/5 – Jedi Craft Girl

6/10 – Nancy Zieman

6/12 – The Sassy Quilter

6/17 – Just Let Me Quilt

6/19 – Simple Simon & Co.

6/24 – Haberdashery Fun

6/26 – Sew We Quilt

7/1 – Jina Barney Designz

7/3 – Leigh Laurel Studios

7/8 – Riley Blake Designs

Keep it Sassy

You can find and follow TheSassyQuilter  on Facebook, Pinterest, Bloglovin’, Instagram, Twitter or by email updates(form on right sidebar)!

Share Button

So You Wanna Make A Quilt…Part 8- Binding Your Quilt


Part 8- Binding

What is quilt binding anyway???

Well, just like the binding on a book holds the pages together…binding on a quilt holds the raw edges of the quilt together! Not to mention it also adds that final border and pizazz to your quilt:)

The binding or finished edge of a quilt often gets the most wear so it needs to be durable and stronger than the rest of your quilt to keep it from unraveling. You are probably asking your self, how do I get it on there? Don’t stress! I am going to give you some tips and lots of pics to make it super easy.

Binding your quilt

What you need to know to Bind Your Quilt?

There are a couple of things to decide before you actually get to it:) What type of binding do you want to use, what technique to apply it, how much you will need and how to finish it off.

Types of Binding: Bias or Grain

Bias Binding is cut on the diagonal(or bias grain), using the 45 degree line on your ruler.

Grain Binding is cut using either horizontal or vertical lines that follow the straight or crossgrain of your fabric.

Forget what in the world these things are? Remember this diagram:)


The benefits of bias binding is that is stretchy and is great for binding curves. The fabric is also a little stronger when cut like this and will wear less over time. That being said….I always use a straight grain binding unless working with curved edges and so far so good:)

Techniques for Binding: Machine or Hand

When binding your quilt you will attach the binding to one side and the attach it to the other to seal up your quilt. There are lots of techniques for this and you have to find the one that works for you!

Machine binding is done…you guessed it…with your sewing machine!

Hand binding is actually done using your machine on the front of your quilt, but finished off by hand on the back for a seamless look. This is considered the more traditional way to finish your quilt and takes a bit more time to do.

How much do I need?

Binding is typically cut in 2.5″ strips and then joined together to form one unit that will go all the way around your quilt. There is a simple formula to calculate exactly how many strips you will need!

binding formula

If you have a smart phone there is a great app by Robert Kaufman called The Quilter’s Little Helper for calculating all sorts of quilty things! And I love LilyStreetQuilts.com for their border, backing and binding calculator.

Border,binding,backing calculator

Okay, okay…How do I actually do it!!!

I have got two tutorials to help you out.

   make your own binding

and…  How to bind a quilt

I will show you how to make your binding first and then how to attach it to your quilt and finish it by machine! Just click on the tutorial links or pics to get there.

This is the end of our So You Wanna Make A Quilt…Beginner Quilting Series….I know, kind of sad right?  Good luck with all your quilty adventures and feel free to email or comment any questions you may have!

To find Parts 1 through 8…Click HERE!


You can find and follow TheSassyQuilter here on Facebook, Pinterest, Bloglovin’, or by email(form on right sidebar)!

Keep it Sassy


Share Button

Triangle Quilt

Triangle Quilt

Triangle Quilt- 49.5″ x 65″

My Triangle Quilt is finally finished and bound! This one was fun to quilt too…lots of straight lines makes it simpler:)

Triangle Quilt

The fabrics are Simply Style and Boho Girl.  I also threw in some solids to break it up.


If you want to know more info on how I cut and pieced this Triangle Quilt, visit my previous posts HERE and HERE.


I loved this fun paisley for the backing. I like the back of a quilt to be extra sassy!


I quilted it using a 50wt. Aurifil thread in lime from the Simplify collection. I am so in love with these threads!!! I used a navy for the binding.


You can get this set at Cotton Bliss HERE!


HERE is the tutorial I used to machine bind this quilt.


P.S. Have you checked out Gotcha Covered Quilting?

Gotcha Covered Quilting

Here is their Etsy shop with lots and lots of great fabrics to start off your new year and new projects!


You can find and follow TheSassyQuilter here on Facebook, Pinterest, Bloglovin’, or by email(form on right sidebar)!

Keep it Sassy

Share Button

WIP Wednesday



Moving right along with my UFO’s, this one not quite so old! I created a free beginner quilt pattern called Strawberry Jam when I started my blog, but (*wincing in shame*) I only made the top. It is a pretty simple pattern for beginners who want to make something bigger, but don’t need to get crazy. Actually it’s not just for beginners, but it is easy! A quick fun project with a modern feel. Here is the free pattern: Strawberry Jam.

I made this quilt from generic stash, but some of the strips are from a jelly roll, Odds and End by Julie Comstock for Moda.

I love polka dots and a big pool of fresh binding

Well the binding is ready to be bound, and I am going to try a “new to me” technique using a zig-zag stitch to finish the binding. We will see…

See ya Friday for the next block in the Virtual Quilting Bee!

Keep it Sassy

(Links: WIPWednesday@FreshlyPieced, WeDidItWednesday@SewMuchAdo, QuiltStory, NeedleandThreadThursday@MyQuiltInfatuation)

Share Button

Binding your Quilt – Part 3


For the complete guide to binding your quilt…click here!

Are we done yet? Machine Finishing your Binding

1. Now that all your binding is attached to the front of your quilt, you now have to secure it to the other side.

Once again, start at a mid-point of one of the sides of your quilt. Fold the binding over to the backside of the quilt. Secure it to the back with a pin, making sure to cover the previously stitched line. You can go ahead and pin the binding along the entire quilt edge or just work in sections.

IMG_1149 IMG_1150

2. When you get to the corner, make sure you turn it completely, pushing the corner out to a nice point. Fold one side of the binding over and pin. Then turn the other over and pin. They should overlap forming a fold that goes out to the point of the corner(mitered fold).

IMG_1156 IMG_1157

3. Turn the quilt over so that you’re looking at the top of the quilt. Insert your needle into the seam where your binding meets the quilt top. The goal here is to sew in the seam line. When you pinned the binding over to the back of the quilt and made sure to cover the line of stitching, you made sure that you will catch the fabric when stitching on the front of the quilt. Sewing in the seam line hides your stitching on the front of your quilt,too.

If you use a matching thread it won’t be so noticeable if you wander out every now and then, like that could ever happen...


4. When you get to the corner, leave your needle down directly in the corner. Lift your presser foot and turn the quilt so you can head down the next side. Keep going till you get to where you started, then sew a few stitches over your beginning stitches and you are done!!!

Fantabulous!!! Your SASSY binding is D-O-N-E!

(Look at that quilt, whipping in the breeze…so securely bound it could last for ages!)



Great Job! All you Sassy Quilters out there:) Keep me posted on your binding and let’s get these quilts finished!

Happy Binding

Click here for the complete Sassy Guide to binding your quilt!

Share Button

Binding your Quilt – Part 2




How do I join the Ends!?!

1. First, determine the unfolded width of your binding strip. In my case it is 2 1/2″ .

2. Overlap the ends of your binding strips and trim the ends so that they overlap by the same amount as the width of your strip. Here they are overlapped 2 1/2″. Do your trimming so you are still working in the middle of your unfinished area. This just makes it easier to handle under the machine.


3. Now, lay the ends of your binding strips face to face at a right angle, and pin securely. Draw a line from corner to corner (using the corners that connect to the binding, not the outer and inner corners). If you sew the wrong corners, don’t worry, it will not look right and you can just pick out and try again. If the quilt is toward you, this should look like a little mountain top.


4. Sew along this line, remove your pins and open it up to make sure its right. If it looks good, go ahead and trim your excess off, leaving a 1/4″ seam. Finger press the seam open and re-fold your binding in half.

IMG_1141 IMG_1142

5. Pin the binding in place and start sewing a few stitches on top of where you left off and over top of where you started, to make sure there are no gaps. Yay! You made it all the way around:)


 Check in next week for Part 3 – Are we done Yet? Finishing your Binding by Machine

Share Button

Binding your Quilt – Part 1



Before you start…..you have to create your binding strips!

Check here for how to make your own binding,

or buy some pre-made(you may still have to join some packages together to have it long enough).

Get your binding strips cut, joined together and then pressed in half

and you are ready to get this binding partay started!


Where do I start?

1. Trim and square up the edges of your quilt. You should have excess backing and batting that needs to be removed.


2. Start the binding process at a mid-point on one of the sides of your quilt. It is hard(if not impossible) to join your ends together at a corner, and its less noticeable if it doesn’t look fantastic….like that could ever happen, your a quilty superstar and you can do this in a snap!


3. Leave a 6″ tail of binding before you start attaching it to your quilt. This gives you room work in when joining the final two ends together.


4. Pin your binding to the front of your quilt. You want the raw edges to line up with the outer edge of your quilt, this means the folded edge is toward the center area of the quilt. Pin the binding just until you get to the first corner you come to. Place a pin or mark a small line 1/4″ away from the very end of your top. Don’t worry this mark will be on the inside so you won’t see it.


5. Now start sewing  a 1/4″ seam along the binding, removing pins as you go. Take a couple of back stitches at your starting point. Continue sewing along the binding and stop 1/4″ away from the corner(at your pin or mark). Again, take a couple back stitches and then take your quilt out of the machine. We need to fold the binding a little before we continue.


6. Fold the binding strip upward, this should make a triangular fold with the point going directly into the corner of your quilt(left pic); Now, fold the binding strip back down onto the next side of the quilt you will be working on. This fold should be flush with the side we have already attached(right pic). Pin this in place at the fold and continue to pin along this side of your quilt, marking/pinning the 1/4″ mark at the next corner.

IMG_1126 IMG_1127

7. Start sewing your 1/4″ seam again, beginning at the very edge of the quilt. Stop again at your next 1/4″ mark or pin before the corner, and repeat the corner folds from step #5.


8. After you round your last corner, stop approximately 12″ apart from where you started. Take a couple of back stitches, and remove your quilt from the machine.



What is the most frustrating part of binding your quilt???

Check in next week for Part 2 – How do I join those Ends!?!

Share Button

How to make Binding like a Pro!



1. First things first……you need to decide how much binding you will need.

Here is a great binding calculator you can use:



Just plug in your numbers for your quilt size(ex. 45″ x 60″), width of your fabric(42″ is a safe #), beginning width of your binding strips(usually 2  to 2.5) and it will tell you how much yardage you need and how many strips to cut….Awesome:)

Now that you know how much you need, go ahead and cut your strips.

2.The next step is to prep the strips so we can join them together. I like to leave my strips folded in half, just like when I cut them, and then trim the selvages off the ends.

                         IMG_1378        IMG_1080

3. Unfold and place one end of a binding strip right side up, lay the end of another strip wrong side up on top of the strip at a right angle(like the letter “t”). It should overlap on all sides. Use the lines of your mat to make sure it’s straight.



4. Draw a line from corner to corner. I like to pull the fabric over my ruler to see if this makes a continuous strip, just to check myself….it never hurts. Secure with pins on both sides of the line so it doesn’t slip.

                          IMG_1099         IMG_1100  


5. Sew directly on the marked line. Line up your 1/4″ mark on your ruler along the stitched line and trim excess.


6. Press open and then press open your seams on the back. Making bias binding(binding where seams are joined at 45 degree angle) and pressing open seams allows your binding to be less bulky where it joins the next strip. Continue adding strips until you have one long strip of binding.

                       IMG_1109           IMG_1110


7.Trim your “dog ears” off the edges.



8. Now….to the ironing board. Fold the binding strip in half and press closed. Working your way down the entire strip.



Your binding is ready! Isn’t it cute?

IMG_1114 IMG_1119

 Sassy Binding….if I don’t say so myself:)


Share Button

Easy Beginner Project- Baby Charm Quilt


Click here for pattern

Here is a project easy enough for any newbie on the block!  All you need to get started is a charm pack that you are in love with and 1 yard of a coordinating fabric for the border.  Check out the pattern for all the details to finish the quilt.

For my Baby Charm Quilt, I used a charm pack called Lily & Will II by Bunny Hill Designs for Moda Fabrics:

lilywill2 lilywill

Charm packs are great for easy quick projects.  They are pre-cut 5″ squares and the fabrics are already coordinated, so you can get right to the fun part….making your project.  Check out our Sassy Deals for great sites to buy charm packs…WARNING!!! Pre-cuts are addictive and you may have to buy every single one you like…..so give yourself a budget:)

One charm pack is good for a baby quilt this size, you will need several to make larger projects. Check out my Helpful Charts page to help you know how many.

So, I laid out my charms how I liked them, put them together, added my borders and Voila! Check out my Strawberry Jam posts for help with assembling blocks, rows and borders.

This will charm any baby and their mama:)


Share Button